Walking with the Saints

Thomas Cramner

Archbishop of Canterbury, Liturgist, and Martyr, 1556
This coming Wednesday, March 20, we commemorate the life of Thomas Canmer. I am pleased that Thomas was on my day to “preach”!  He is, to me, the GREAT Reformer, along with Martin Luther, and other Lutheran reformers, as you can read in this bio.

Cranmer was associated with King Henry VIII, after meeting the King in 1529, he later became involved in the annulment of the King’s marriage to Catherine of Aragon. King Henry VIII, upon the death of Archbishop Warham, appointed Cranmer to the See of Canterbury (still a Roman Catholic church), and he was consecrated on March 30, 1533. 

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Y(Our) Saviour Center Update

We are working hard to raise money to support our services!

We have 3 wonderful grant writers submitting requests to foundations to help pay the operating costs of Our Saviour Center. Operating costs include things like staff salaries, rent, utility bills, maintenance, etc. We are preparing grant requests to The Autrey Foundation and The Armand Hammer Foundation and are looking for ANY contacts within either / both of these organizations.

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Walking Club @ the Dorris Dann Kids Campus!

The students at the Dorris Dann Kids Campus are at it again.  Every day after school, about 120 children in our walking club walk about a 1.3 mile to the Dorris Dann Kids Campus after school.  Each day they walk for about 30 minutes on a designated safe route.  Each week they have over 500+ students participating in the walking club along our dedicated staff, even during the cold days.

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Walking with the Saints

James Theodore Holly

James Theodore Holly was the First African American Bishop in the Episcopal Church and Bishop of Haiti. 

Born in 1829 in Washington, DC, James Theodore Holly was the descendent of freed slaves.

Holly was baptized and raised a Catholic yet gradually he moved away from the Catholic Church. He spent his early years in Washington, D. C. and Brooklyn, NY where he connected with Frederick Douglass and other Black abolitionists. He was active in anti-slavery conventions in the free states, participating in abolitionist activities. 

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Praying Towards Wednesday

Matthew 6:1-6, 16-21

As part of our Ash Wednesday service, the celebrant invites us to the observance of a holy Lent. We are invited to examine our spiritual intentions. This is a time when we humbly ask ourselves, “What is essential for me as a faithful believer?”  How would you respond to that question?  For me, it is my relationship with God. Everything else flows from this intimate experience of the Holy.  When I find myself falling short of what it means to live as a Christian, it usually is because I take this relationship with the divine for granted and I have somehow turned away from it.

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Prayer Partners

The Opportunity to pray for each other.

Lent is an opportunity to be very intentional in our individual spiritual practices. Some choose to “give up” something. others choose to take on other spiritual practices that prepare each of us for the joy of Easter. This year, the Church of Our Saviour will give our members on opportunity to intentionally pray for each other.

This is an idea that was presented to me by Charlotte Van Fleet. The concept is, each person desiring to be a person praying for other individuals in our parish will be given a list of names. You will pray for that list of people for the duration of Lent.

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Lent Madness 2019 The Saintly Smackdown is back!

From Lent Madness Team:

Just when you thought Lent couldn’t possibly become even more penitential, have we got an online hair shirt for you! For the tenth year running, people of faith are filling out saintly brackets and gearing up for the 2019 “saintly smack down.” 

With its unique blend of competition, learning, and humor, Lent Madness allows participants to be inspired by the ways in which God has worked through the lives of saintly souls across generations and cultures. Throughout Lent, thirty-two saints will do battle to win the coveted Golden Halo. Based loosely on the NCAA basketball tournament of a similar name, this online devotion pits saints against one another in a bracket as voters choose their favorites throughout this penitential season.

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Rector Search Update

The Rector Search Committee has met seven times since being commissioned. Knowing that once we begin reviewing candidates, there will be times of differing opinions, we have spent the front end of our time together getting to know each other and building relationships to position ourselves to better work through such periods.

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From the Sr. Warden

Washing Black Socks

This year the Vestry has made some tough decisions regarding the Church of Our Saviour Budget.  To take a term from Fr. Bob Honeychurch’s sermon of (Jan. 24, 2019, which will be available at the annual meeting), “It’s time to wash the socks”. As a Vestry we can no longer say “not yet” regarding significant reductions to our operating budget.

To start the budget process, each division of the church presented their “dream budget” to the parish administrator and the finance committee. This was then given to the Vestry. This dream budget would have resulted in a draw from the endowment of over $750,000 which is clearly out of line with our current reality. Cuts were made to keep operations “status quo”.

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Walking with the Saints

George Herbert 

Our Saint du Jour is George Herbert, who was a priest in a small rural parish in England from 1630 to 1633.  He became the patron saint of St. Andrew’s Bemerton, even though he died an untimely death of tuberculosis at the age of 39, just five years after he was ordained a priest.

Herbert was born into privilege and became a scholar and a member of the English Parliament and a friend of King James I.  Nevertheless he chose a life as a deacon of the Church of England in 1626, and then a few years later a priest at Bemerton.  The parish church still stands along with the rectory where Herbert lived.  He was noted for his unfailing care for his parishioners, bringing the sacraments to them when they were ill and providing food and clothing for those in need.

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Walking with the Saints

Frederick Douglass

In Holy Women, Holy Men, they refer to Frederick Douglass as being a “Prophetic Witness”.  That he very much was, but the fact of the matter is, if the system that Douglass was born into had its way, he would have never been heard of at all.  Douglass was born into slavery in or around 1818, on a plantation in Maryland.  Common practices during slavery were to separate the infant from the mother at an early age, therefore Douglass would be raised by his Grandmother till the age of 6 before being given to another slave owner.  Another likely possibility is that Douglass was the plantation owner’s son.

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Walking with the Saints

Absalom Jones

Absalom Jones, the first African American ordained in the Episcopal Church, is a giant in the history of our church. Imagine being born a slave in the middle of the 17th century and accomplishing what this man accomplished. He managed to buy his wife’s freedom and seven years later his own while studying and fulfilling the responsibilities his owner put upon him. You can tell from his story that he was a man of profound integrity and morality.

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Computers Needed 

We are in need of a few personal computers or laptops that we can make available to some of our Jubilee sober living home residents who are going to school.   It is almost mandatory nowadays for college or vocational school students to have access to a computer.

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Farewell to Taylor

It is with a mixture of joy and sadness that I write to tell you of an exciting new chapter in Taylor Vazquez-Reyes’ life and ministry. Taylor has accepted a full-time position with Bright Star Charter Schools in Panorama City, where she will be teaching music education and choir.

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Walking with the Saints

Jesuit priest Francis Xavier was sent by Spain to develop a mission in Japan. The daimyo (powerful feudal lords) who were hoping to create a trade agreement with Europe gave permission. The Daimyo was hoping the Catholic mission would lessen the influence of Buddhist monks and help trade with Spain and Portugal. Increasingly they saw Catholicism as a threat and began to persecute Christians.  Christianity was banned and those Japanese who refused to abandon their faith were killed.

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