Posts tagged Weekly
Annual Hunger Walk

Join Bill’s Team and Walk to end hunger!

I am forming a team to participate in the CROP Hunger Walk Pasadena on Sunday, November 3.

The 5K walk begins at 1:30 PM and the round trip starts at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church, 1879 N. Lake Avenue, Altadena.

So far Kim Sirean and Hannah Riley and I form the “Church of Our Saviour” team, but you can register also if you wish to be a part.

As in past years, I am requesting from 150 friends a $10 donation (= $1,500) to help end hunger in our local community (through local agencies) and around the world (through Church World Service). To register yourself for the walk or to donate simply go to “crop hunger walk pasadena” on your computer, follow the prompts and enter “Church of Our Saviour” as the team name. Or you can give to any member of our team (before November 3) a check made out to CWS/CROP (tax-deductible).

Read More
O Day of Peace That Dimly Shines Through All Our Hopes and Prayers and Dreams

My thoughts this week whipsaw between England, Germany, the Crusades, Jerusalem, a seder, the bishop, Elijah, and a kid’s song; you know, the usual. It is all a jumbled mess, which is what one might find looking inside my head as I try to formulate an idea, but what it all comes down to is one thing: an empty chair.

At Church of Our Saviour, we have a chair near the altar which for the most part sits empty, awaiting the arrival of our bishop. After all, we are the Episcopal church, “episcopal” meaning “of our relating to a bishop.” It is only right to have a chair waiting for when he can be with us.

Read More
Walking with the Saints

Saint Luke the Evangelist (October 18)

 How does one determine the authorship of a text when it does not directly provide a name?  This was the challenge facing the early church as it collected the many writings that would become The New Testament. Based on style, language and repeating themes, it was clear that the same person wrote a two-volume text that was separated into two books: the third Gospel and the Book of Acts.  For example, both are addressed to Theophilus, which means “Beloved of God.”  This could be an individual or it could describe the nascent Christian community. Using a   literary device of the time, the ending of the third Gospel and the start of the Book of Acts repeat the telling of Jesus’ Ascension. 

Read More
Stewardship: (Re)New

Dear sisters and brothers in Christ,

I write you this day to ask for your financial commitment to Church of Our Saviour’s 2020 Annual Giving Campaign.  This year’s stewardship team chose the theme “Renew” for 2020 because together we are renewing our commitment to God’s dream for Church of Our Saviour as we join in discerning how that dream might manifest. 

Each year there are important details to remind ourselves of during the Annual Giving Campaign. Church of Our Saviour’s operating budget is entirely self-sustaining. 

Read More
Walking with the Saints

St. Teresa of Avila, Nun, 1515- 1582

St. Teresa of Avila was a Spanish mystic, writer and reformer of the Carmelite order. She was an influential and pivotal figure of her generation.

She was the originator of the Carmelite Reform, which restored and emphasized the austerity and contemplative character of primitive Carmelite life. St. Teresa was elevated to doctor of the church in 1970 by Pope Paul VI, the first woman to be so honored.

According to Catholic online:

St. Teresa was born March 28, 1515, in Avila, Spain.  Her mother died when Teresa was young.  As a teenager, she cared only about boys, clothes, flirting, and rebelling. When she was 16, her father decided she was out of control and sent her to a convent.

Read More
I Sing A Song of the Saints of God

We have been walking with the saints these last few weeks here at COS.  It has gotten me thinking about some of the people in my life that have affected me deeply and gotten me to where I am today.  By the way, if you do see me, please tell me where I am.

Since this is a music column, I will skip those special people who have been mentors to me outside of that part of my life.  I thought I might write about someone who had a profound impact on me musically.  This could mean I might write about my high school choir director, for whom I was privileged to sing with for five years (no, I didn't fail one year - he was the choir director at my junior high for one year as well).  He actually gave me my first opportunity to conduct a choir when I was on break from my freshman year in college.  However, he is still alive. 

Read More
Y(Our) Saviour Center Spotlight

Thank you one and all for your incredible support of Our Saviour Center’s annual fundraiser.  By all signs, everyone had a great time: Enjoyed the yummy food from Dickey’s; enjoyed the many ways to financially support OSC through Silent and Live Auctions, 50/50 drawing, Wine Pull and for the first time this year, the “Rainy Day Van” support.  Look for future articles here to learn about more ways to get involved with OSC and our community, and to help us live our mission of “sharing love, hope and resources with our neighbors in need”.  

Read More
Sing Choirs of Angels, Sing in Exultation!

This week I have been trying to plan the music for services through the first Sunday of Advent, so I have spent a bit of time in the choir room.  There is a lot of history in that room.  On the walls are posters from choir tours and photographs from years past.  Recently, a new framed photo appeared.  I am not sure where it came from, but it’s an older photo from back in black and white times, possibly back to the 1960s.  I figure that’s when it’s from because I remember when “Gilligan’s Island” and “I Dream of Jeannie” were in black and white.

In this photo, I noticed that there were an abundance of men in the choir.  As I counted, there were actually more men in the photo than women. 

Read More
Walking with the Saints

St. Francis - Truly Free

When Francis’ father Pietro Bernardone returned home from a trip to France in 1182 and learned that his new son had been baptized with the name of Giovanni after John the Baptist, he was furious. The last thing he wanted was for his son to be a man of God. Instead he wanted him to follow in his footsteps and be a businessman – particularly a successful cloth merchant like himself, He abruptly changed his son’s name to Francesco, which is equal to calling him a Frenchman, a country dear to Pietro’s heart.

Francis was well liked by most, if not all people as a young man. People catered to him and he had a rich and easy early life. He was also a bit of a party guy, naturally becoming the leader of a crowd of young people who spent their nights in wild parties. Francis himself would later say that he “lived in sin” during that time.

Read More
The Book Sale Returns

Beginning September 29, the sale of books, films, and music will resume on the COS patio from 9am until 12:30, and will continue as weather and health permit when the COS schedule allows.

Beginning in November there will be an emphasis on Advent and Christmas music and books. All proceeds benefit COS Music Department...when our new Minister of Music arrives there will be funds to support the program for God's glory.

Read More
Mandarin & English Project at COS

Volunteers Needed for COS Mandarin/English Project

We are seeking volunteers to assist us in the critical process of helping our Mandarin-speaking brothers and sisters at COS to improve their English-speaking skills. You don’t need to know Mandarin, nor do you need a background in language instruction. It‘s a fairly simple process, and most people who are fluent in English can do it.

Read More
Let All Who Have Breath...

This coming week marks the beginning of the High Holy Days, the Days of Awe, starting with Rosh Hashanah, the beginning of the Jewish New Year.

Nearly 130 years ago, a young man, a peddler from Lithuania, came to the United States.  He settled in a small town in upstate New York.  At the time, Hoosick Falls, NY was known as a company town, the home of the Walter A. Wood Mowing and Reaping Machine Company.  He however got a job as a clerk at a newly opened drygoods store called M. Lurie & Company, and eventually married the younger sister of the owner of the store.

Within Hoosick Falls, a congregation was forming from a number of the newly arrived immigrants.  This newly formed shul named themselves Love Peace.

Read More
Walking with the Saints

Sergius of Radonezh was born as Bartholomew sometime between 1314 and 1322, in town called Rostov, North East of Moscow.  His parents were of the Nobility and it is said that as a baby, the Lord had already chosen Bartholomew as God’s own.  In fact, the baby is said to have begun fasting on certain days refusing milk from his mother.  Also, if his mother used oil in their food, he would refuse milk on that day as well.  As a young boy, Bartholomew struggled with his studies and struggled in learning how to read.  One day, as Bartholomew was tending to their horses, he met a traveling Monk who was praying.  The monk greeted Bartholomew and asked him what he wanted, to which he replied that he wanted more than anything to read.  With that the monk offered up a blessing and prayer for Bartholomew’s ability to read.  Then he took a piece of bread out of his bag and gave it to Bartholomew to eat. 

Read More
For Where Two or Three are Gathered

I live in Altadena.  Usually it is very quiet.  But on some evenings in the waning months of summer, coyotes come down out of the foothills.  They gather very near, just behind my home, and together yip and howl.  Some of you might have known that for many years we had a golden retriever.  He used to join his voice with sirens that happened by: police, fire, ambulance – he was not picky - as if to say “I am with you!“

Read More
News, MusicPhil GoldWeeklyComment
Walking with the Saints

 Edward Bouverie Pusey

Pusey was born into noble lineage on August 22, 1800 near Oxford.  He was calm and self-assured but isolated. He accepted his mother’s High Anglican teaching and moved toward a clerical vocation by way of Eaton and Oxford.  After studying Theology and languages in Germany he was nominated Regis Professor of Hebrew at Oxford by the Duke of Wellington.

He joined John Keble and John Henry Newman as part of the Oxford Movement, a movement that sought a renewal of Catholic thought and practice within the Church of England in opposition to its protestant tendencies.

Read More
"How Can I Keep From Singing?"  And Why Not You Too?

Last Sunday, Our Saviour Sunday, was a special day.  It was a wonderful celebration of the many ministries COS has to offer and an opportunity to welcome our new rector, Fr. Jeffrey Thornberg.  The choir sang beautifully and the handbells rang out in welcome.

Over this last summer, I spent some time sitting with the congregation, listening to all of the wonderful voices you all offer up each week.  I couldn't help but think how glorious the choir at COS would be with a few additional voices supplementing our very loyal choir members who offer up their talents every week.  Minus our paid section leaders, we had ten singers in our choir last Sunday, and that includes someone who joined us who hadn't sung with us for quite a while (thank you, Laurel Bullock, for joining us).

Read More
News, MusicPhil GoldWeeklyComment
Walking with the Saints

Henry Thacker “Harry” Burleigh

Henry Thacker "Harry" Burleigh (December 2, 1866 – September 12, 1949), was an African-American classical composer, arranger, and professional singer known for his baritone voice. The first black composer instrumental in developing characteristically American music, Burleigh made black music available to classically trained artists both by introducing them to spirituals and by arranging them in a more classical form. He is most remembered for recovering and arranging many Negro spirituals for solo voice and piano and bringing that gift to the concert stage.

Although Harry was classically trained at the National Conservatory of Music and enjoyed great accomplishments, the path that brought him there was not always smooth. His grandfather, Hamilton Waters – a slave who was granted manumission from slavery after paying $55 dollars ($50 for himself and $5 for his mother) – was once beaten so savagely that he was left blind.

Read More
Welcome the Thornbergs!

This week we are privileged to welcome our new Rector and his family to the fellowship of the Church of Our Saviour!

The Rev. Jeffrey Thornberg will preach his inaugural sermon this Sunday at 7:45 a.m. and at a combined service with our English and Mandarin congregations at 10:15 a.m.  This is also the occasion of our annual “Our Saviour Sunday” which begins our fall program year.

Father Jeff brings with him his wife Annie and three girls:  Eleanor, who is seven and is a new student in second grade at Coolidge School; Harriet, who is four and is a new student at our Child’s Garden School; and baby Frances, who is 15 months.

Read More